Diversity Headlines

Deadly Derailment in Moscow, Big Tobacco Merger and 603 Dead from Ebola

Colorlines - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 07:00
Deadly Derailment in Moscow, Big Tobacco Merger and 603 Dead from Ebola

Here's what I'm reading up on this morning: 

  • Tracy Morgan is still recovering from a deadly car crash in which he was critically injured, and speaks out to paparazzi for the first time since. 
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Palestinian Americans Weigh in On Homeland Crisis

New America Media - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 01:10
 DEARBORN — As the war rages on Gaza, Palestinian American activists told The Arab American News about the severity of the humanitarian situation, urging the community to organize and mobilize for the Palestinian cause. Political science professor Abdelhamid Siyam, who... Ali Harb http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

The Caribbean: A Clean Energy Revolution on the Front Lines of Climate Change

New America Media - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 01:00
photo: Children in Georgetown, Guyana learn about solar energy during an exhibition. Credit: CREDPBRIDGETOWN, Barbados - Lefties Food Stall, a pint-sized eatery serving Barbados’ signature flying-fish sandwiches, recently became the first snack shack on the Caribbean island to be fitted... Richard Schiffman http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Volviendo a casa: Cuidando de la creciente población de adultos mayores

New America Media - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 13:18
EnglishTenaz y un poco luchadora, Hellen Aitel alcanzó sus 90 años disfrutando de una vida mayormente autosuficiente. Hasta que le realizaron una operación en 2012. "Entró al hospital caminando y regresó a casa en una silla de ruedas", dice su... Anne Kavanagh http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Take this Ring -- But Keep Your Name

Hyphen Blog - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:31

Sylvie Kim is getting married and keeping her name -- no matter what the county clerk thinks about it.

read more

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NYC Offers IDs to Undocumented Immigrants

New America Media - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:03
Beginning next year, no New Yorker will be undocumented who doesn't want to be, at least in the Big Apple.Mayor Bill de Blasio last Thursday signed a bill that allows all New Yorkers -- regardless of their immigration status --... El Diario http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Las mujeres también juegan el deporte rey

New America Media - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 10:01
Foto: Abby Wambach / EFEEnglish TranslationCon toda la emoción del final del Mundial el fin de semana pasada, ¿sabía que lo que llamamos el Mundial es verdaderamente el Mundial de los hombres y que las mujeres tendrán su Mundial en... Ann Marie Hager http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Women Play Soccer Too

New America Media - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 09:52
Photo: Abby Wambach / EFETraducción al españolWith all the hype around this weekend's knock-out rounds of the World Cup, did you know that what we refer to worldwide as the World Cup is actually the Men’s World Cup and that... Ann Marie Hager http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Junot Diaz on Success and Catastrophe

Colorlines - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 08:22
Junot Diaz on Success and Catastrophe

Junot Diaz is a widely popular writer, probably one of the most influential of our generation. So he should feel pretty settled, right? Wrong, according to a recent interview with the Financial Times in which the author sheds some light on the financial realities of the publishing world.

So has success liberated him? "I have that deep-seated fear of catastrophe that a lot of immigrants have," he replies. In the 11 years between Drown and Oscar Wao, his after-tax income from book sales was just $50,000 in total. Things have improved but he continues to teach at MIT. He likes the students, who he says are better for not wanting to be novelists, unlike those in other creative writing classes. "If you think learning salsa is your future, you're going to be pretty insufferable in salsa classes."

The author goes on to talk about his MacArthur Genius Grant, the Pulitzer and being a slow writer. Read more

Categories: Diversity Headlines

Bergdahl to Return to Active Duty, VW to Make SUV in Tenn., and Supermoon Photos

Colorlines - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 06:56
Bergdahl to Return to Active Duty, VW to Make SUV in Tenn., and Supermoon Photos

Here's what I'm reading up on this morning:

Categories: Diversity Headlines

Ana Tijoux Talks Music and Motherhood

Colorlines - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 06:31
Ana Tijoux Talks Music and Motherhood

Ana Tijoux needs coffee. The 36-year-old Chilean hip-hop star is in the middle of a whirlwind publicity tour to promote her fifth solo album, "Vengo," and on the Thursday morning that press surround her at the Latin Alternative Music Conference, she's tired. She took the stage the night before at Central Park's Summer Stage, commanding the attention of a rain-soaked audience with a live band and DJ that alternated seamlessly between hardcore hip-hop and funk-infused ballads.

But it's not just the music that's got Tijoux in need of a caffeine boost, it's motherhood. She's traveled to the U.S. with her two children in tow, including a toddler son and a newborn daughter.  She's spent nearly two decades spelling out her politics through music, most notably on her last album, "1977." The eponymous single featured on AMC's "Breaking Bad" refers to the year that she was born in France to parents who had escaped the murderous Pinochet dictatorship. But it's now, while waking up for 4 a.m. feedings, that the rapper feels that her political identity has most come into focus. "It's amazing because I think that motherhood is the place where you get to apply everything that you say," she says.

Despite the fatigue, Tijoux is gracious, funny and thankful to the woman who brought her a large cup of Dunkin' Donuts coffee. Like so many women, she's a working mother who's trying to make the world a better place for her children. Along with Radio Valencia *I talked briefly with Tijoux about her activism, music and motherhood.

Colorlines: Do you see any parallels between activists in the U.S. and activists in Chile?

That's a good question. I think to have a really true answer, I should come here more. I've got a very superficial vision about it. I had the chance to deal with some activist singers, but I feel like I don't have a proper vision about it because I'm not here so many times to see the differences and similarities.

Colorlines: You recently released a track called "Somos Sur" with Palestinian emcee Shadia Mansour. What inspired you to speak out about Palestine?

The situation with Palestine is not something new. I remember when I was very young, two or three years old, we used to live in France and a bunch of friends of my parents were Palestinian. It was a topic at home. I had the chance to have an education where my parents always told me that a situation of the world is not an isolated situation. Your problem is my problem. With that point of view in this sense, I always had some sensibility with the Palestinian vision because I feel that some resistance is very similar to what's happened in Latin America.

Secondly, Chile is a very strange country. I don't know the reason, but it's a country with one of the biggest Palestinian populations outside of Palestine after Jordan. I think we've got some connections with Palestine. We can't pretend like what's happening invisible.  What's happening isn't new, it's been genocide after genocide in front of our eyes.

Colorlines: How has motherhood impacted your perspective as an artist?

 My face! [Laughs.] I don't have a face. I'm always tired, I'm always asking for coffee. I would love to say that I had an amazing night drinking, but no, I had to take ibuprofen. It's not trendy at all.  I would say that it's amazing because I think that motherhood is the place where you get to apply everything that you say. I always say this, but I think it's important to say. I think that as a human being and as an artist or whatever, we can say a lot of things in front of tape recorders and cameras in our music, but it's at home where we get to apply everything that we say. Education, solidarity, compassion. It's in that nest where you get to apply everything that you say in your music.

Radio Valencia: In terms of your lyrics, I know you wrote this album while you were pregnant. Has the experience of motherhood changed how you think about music, how you're touring?

Totally, because I'm not the same as what I used to be 10 years ago. We change continually. When we don't change, the fiber and the DNA of what we think changes. I have to learn much more about discipline. I wake up at 4 a.m. to give food to my girl and then I wrote, and in that sense it was amazing. At the same time, I was very into this album, but I understood it slowly, not immediately. I knew in my consciousness that I wanted to make an album that my kids could understand and not make it complicated in lyric senses. It's political, but in very simple language. Sometimes I feel that we come from the egocentric place of language and vocabulary where we try to make important words, we forget that we don't make music for musicians. And we don't make music for people who are already convinced. We make music for people to open their eyes and have a dialogue with some people who are in another vibe.

Radio Valencia: What about in terms of the actual music? Sometimes you do ballads, sometimes you rap. You have musical influences from a marching band sound or this song about Palestine. How do you make choices about which songs you're doing to sing as a ballad versus rapping?

 The choice is whatever I feel. I think sometimes we live in a world that's very strange where everything is compact and organized, everything is this so in order. Even in music. More and more, over time, I'm listening to all sorts of music. It's not that I don't like it. Sometimes I listen to music and it's too electronic for me, but I love electronic music.  It's just that I love what's organic. We can be so dehumanized to not listen to an amazing mix from everywhere, so I listen to Ryuicgi Sakamoto, Afrika Bambaataa, then Mos Def. I think that music should be free. In the same sense that you make it, in the same sense that you listen to it. Great music is great music and it doesn't matter where it comes from. If a song can be very emotional with you and open some fucking chakra or whatever, we shouldn't be closed to that. It's those kinds of songs that make you feel human again.

*Post has been modified since publication.

Categories: Diversity Headlines

Aloe Blacc Uses Images of Detroit (And Lots of Product Placement) in New Video

Colorlines - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 06:26

If there's one thing that Aloe Blacc's team knows how to do exceptionally well, it's how wring corporate endorsements from his new album. The singer released the video for his song "Hello World (The World is Ours)", which also happens to be the FIFA World Cup anthem. In it, director Shane Drake draws heavily on images of downtrodden Detroit, mixed in with a prominent image of Beats headphones. (Beats Music helped build anticipation for Blacc's latest album when  his song "The Man" was featured in a commercial starring NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.) Take a look. 

Categories: Diversity Headlines

R. Kelly's Ex-Wife Has the Most Wonderful Things to Say About Their Transgender Son

Colorlines - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 06:13
R. Kelly's Ex-Wife Has the Most Wonderful Things to Say About Their Transgender Son

You can't beat a mama's love. When word hit the interwebs that R. Kelly had a teenage transgender son, Jay, the news was reported scandalously in some parts of the black blogesphere. But both of Jay's parents have been hugely supportive, as this VH1 interview with Jay's mom, Drea, proves:

All I can say about Jay is he makes it so easy to be a proud mom. For parents, we need to realize, [our kids] have their own journey. Parents get it wrong when they don't support their children. They have to go out and fight every day and face this world. The first battle should not be at home. I think that a lot of children in the LGBT community don't succeed because the one thing they need the most is foundation. I just tell Jay all the time, baby you won the war. You're gonna have a lot of battles but you won the war. Mama accepts and loves you for who you are. Your family does. My dad is a retired military naval officer and all he said was, "I'm gonna mess up sometimes and [use the feminine pronoun] 'she' but I'm gonna eventually get the 'he' thing. Just give grandpa some time. I'm gonna get it dude." That was it.

Read more.

Categories: Diversity Headlines

Homeward Bound: Caring for the Burgeoning Population of Older Adults

New America Media - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 01:00
Above: Helen Kao, director of geriatric clinical programs, while making a house call on Hellen Aitel in 2013. (Credit: Elisabeth Fall) Traducción al español “She walked into the hospital and came home in a wheelchair,” says her son, Stephen... Anne Kavanagh http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

US Backing Israeli War of Choice In Gaza

New America Media - Sun, 07/13/2014 - 03:40
The moral high ground is always a tenuous piece of property. It is difficult to obtain and is easily lost. It is seen, however, as crucial because most people, all over the world, cannot accommodate the notion that life is... Mitchell Plitnick http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

With World Cup Over, Brazil Faces Its Toughest Opponent

New America Media - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 01:15
FORTALEZA, Brazil – Nearly three thousand kilometers north of São Paulo sits the city of Fortaleza, the commercial capital of Brazil's phenomenal, if sputtering economic boom. In this city of two and a half million, fronting the Atlantic and host... Andrés Tapia http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

New York's New Municipal ID Draws Criticism

Colorlines - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 14:05
New York's New Municipal ID Draws Criticism

Starting in January 2015, New York City residents will be eligible to apply for municipal identification cards. Similar measures have been met with success in New Haven, Conn., as well as several California cities. The New York City Identity Card is intended to provide a basic credential for some of the most marginalized people in the Big Apple. At a signing ceremony for the ID bill Thursday, Mayor Bill de Blasio touted the card's potential beneficiaries

I want to emphasize this card is important for all New Yorkers. It is important for all of us to have a better city. Even for those who already have ID, we're going to make sure that this card brings a lot to the equation, a lot of benefits that will go with it. But for those who don't have ID, it's going to be crucial. And that includes a lot of people - I mentioned almost half a million undocumented immigrants. That's the size of a lot of major American cities in terms of total population - half a million of our fellow New Yorkers. What about adults re-entering society after incarceration? They need extra opportunities this ID will help. Young people in foster care. Transgender people. For the very first time, transgender people will be able to choose their gender marker on their ID, and that's an important opportunity.

Opening a bank account or leasing an apartment is virtually impossible without ID and the city says it's working with banks and credit unions to accept the card. But there are also federal regulations that need to be met in order to open an account, and it's not yet clear whether the New York City Identity Card will be sufficient to meet those requirements.

Perhaps more troubling is the fact that the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) doesn't back the new ID card. While the organization supported a previous version of the bill, it cites major problems with the final version signed yesterday. NYCLU's advocacy director Johanna Miller released a statement outlining concerns:

Unfortunately, the bill that is before the mayor [Thursday] also provides for the city to copy and store people's most sensitive documentation, like pay stubs, social security numbers, and even their children's educational records. In this bill, the city has not done enough to protect those documents from being used by law enforcement. The NYPD, FBI, DHS and others can request these documents without having to show probable cause. And if they are requested, the city has no obligation to even notify the person so they might be able to defend their own privacy. For these reasons, the NYCLU regretfully cannot support this legislation.

The city ID will be available free of charge in its first year and can be obtained through enrollment centers in various municipal institutions starting in January. 

Categories: Diversity Headlines

Murrieta's Anti-Migrant Protests Cost City $50k in Police Overtime

Colorlines - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 14:02
Murrieta's Anti-Migrant Protests Cost City $50k in Police Overtime

Drawing out protestors has turned out to be a costly move for Murrieta, Calif., mayor Alan Long. Long projects that the city has doled out $50,000 in overtime for police officers who've had to work the protest lines in front of the city's border patrol station, the Los Angeles Times reports. In recent weeks demonstrators, who Long encouraged to come out, have repeatedly blocked the attempted drop-off of child migrants. 

Tens of thousands of child migrants, the majority from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala, have arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border in recent years. To deal with the incoming flows, the federal government has started processing migrants at border patrol stations around the country. None have made it to Murrieta, though, as protestors have blocked streets. On July 4, raucous protests ended in six arrests, The Desert Sun reported.

Read more of Colorlines' coverage of the unaccompanied minors crisis. 

Categories: Diversity Headlines

From the Beast to the Fridge - A Salvadoran Youth’s Journey to the U.S.

New America Media - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 13:00
RICHMOND, Calif. – From the moment I woke up, I realized there was something unusual about the morning. The sun wasn’t out, the birds weren’t singing, and instead of the school bus my dad would be taking me to school.... Luis Cubas http://publisher.namx.org/mt-cp.cgi?__mode=view&blog_id=19&id=103
Categories: Diversity Headlines

Marlene Pinnock's Freeway Beating Revives Talk of Officers' Responsibilities

Colorlines - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 11:59
Marlene Pinnock's Freeway Beating Revives Talk of Officers' Responsibilities

Civil rights activists have met with California Highway Patrol representatives, but questions still swirl around CHP officer's violent beating of Marlene Pinnock, a black woman from Los Angeles.

Pinnock had a history of homelessness and interactions with law enforcement officers before July 1, when Pinnock was found walking barefoot on a busy Los Angeles freeway, the Los Angeles Times reports. A CHP officer, whose name has yet to be released, caught up with her and tried to subdue her before pulling her to the ground, straddling her and pummeling her with repeated punches to her face. The beating was caught on video by a passing motorist.

Pinnock's beating has revived a longstanding conversation about the expanded role of police officers in the face of the dwindling mental health and social services. Police and law enforcement officers aren't trained social workers, but they're often the first to respond to crisis calls. Law enforcement agencies have been slow to adapt to this reality, though, and all too quick to resort to violence when they encounter people in crisis. People like Pinnock have gotten caught up in that gap. 

The Los Angeles Times reports:

To some experts, the incident was tragically familiar. The incident, they say, speaks to the ever-evolving, uneven and imperfect encounters that take place daily between law enforcement officers and people in crisis.

"Law enforcement officers are now street corner psychologists," said Carla Jacobs, a prominent advocate for an effective mental health system. "Some are trained well. Some are not. But the reality is that they are cops. They are not psychologists."

Read the rest at the Los Angeles Times.

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