Coverage Analysis

Panel Cites Media Errors in Covering Race-Related Events, Issues

Author: 
Maynard Institute Staff
Wednesday, June 6, 2012

NEW ORLEANS—Faced with unprecedented competition from 24-hour news channels, instant Internet updates and boisterous chatter on talk radio, the mainstream media have made mistakes when reporting on race-related events and issues.
 

Media Coverage of Reproductive Rights Should Include Women of Color

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Media Should Increase Coverage of Minorities’ Retirement Planning Challenges

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Photo Illustration by Roberto Delgado

Mainstream Media Struggles with Reporting on Race Crimes

Author: 
Joshunda Sanders
Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Illustration: Roberto Delgado

Critiquing Western Media Coverage of Africa

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Illustration: Roberto Delgado

Media Coverage of Evangelical Christians Ignores Blacks and Latinos

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Illustration: Roberto Delgado

Media Miss Coverage of Lagging Diversity in Risk Capital Industry

Author: 
Mike Green
Thursday, March 8, 2012

VC Media Diversity Bubbles

Do the Media Contribute to Anti-Asian Rhetoric by Politicians?

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Throughout the campaign season, Republican candidates have repeatedly cited China as an economic threat to the United States, and some have run political ads that civil rights groups say are xenophobic and racist. Concern is growing that such attacks may lead to more discrimination, or perhaps violence, against Asian-Americans.

On Super Bowl Sunday, Pete Hoekstra, a Republican former member of Congress and now a senatorial candidate in Michigan, ran a statewide campaign ad featuring an Asian actress “thanking” Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., for sending American jobs to China.

How the Media Can Improve Coverage of Political Racial Controversies

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, January 18, 2012

While campaigning in Sioux City, Iowa, a few weeks ago, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum unleashed the type of race-baiting tactic that GOP candidates have used, usually with success, for decades.

Santorum faced a predominantly white audience at a campaign stop in a state that is 91.3 percent white, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. So how did the long-shot candidate troll for votes? He spoke disparagingly of African-Americans.