Criminal Justice

Racial disparities are documented in every aspect of the criminal justice system, from massive stop and frisk operations, to who is arrested, charged and convicted. While the powered and crack cocaine sentencing inequality was dramatic, racial disparities exist in sentencing across the board. In another example of structural racism, a felony record makes it all the more difficult to get a job. With so many African American and Latino men serving time in prison, their families and communities are financially stymied. Further, in the states where felons lose their right to vote, large numbers of people of color are disenfranchised.

TV Station Takes Four-Year-Old Child’s Quote Out of Context

Author: 
Bob Butler
Tuesday, August 2, 2011

A Chicago television station is under fire for editing the video of an African-American youth to make it appear that the 4-year-old was advocating gun violence when he clearly stated during the interview that he wanted a gun because his ambition is to be a police officer.   

The CBS station, WBBM, is being blasted by civil rights leaders and news media professionals for taking the youth’s statements out of context, violating the basics of journalism ethics.

Criminal Justice Resources

Monday, January 31, 2011

Racial disparities are documented in every aspect of the criminal justice system, from massive stop and frisk operations, to who is arrested, charged and convicted. While the powered and crack cocaine sentencing inequality was dramatic, racial disparities exist in sentencing across the board. In

The Dark Side of the American Dream

Author: 
Jean Marie Brown
Wednesday, December 18, 2013

White Crime Victims Favored In Mainstream Media Reports

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Collage by Roberto Delgado

Media May Share Responsibility for Sikh Temple Shootings

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Graphic by Roberto Delgado

Why Missing People of Color Aren’t a Media Priority

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Media outlets have traditionally devoted a disproportionate amount of newsprint and airtime to investigating disappearances of middle-class whites, especially women, while often ignoring minority women and other demographics, such as men and the poor.

A 2005 study by Scripps Howard News Service found that although half of missing children are white, they were subjects of more than two-thirds of reports on the Associated Press national news wire during the last five years and for three-fourths of missing-children coverage on CNN.
 

How the Media Can Improve Coverage of Immigration

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Tuesday, January 24, 2012

In recent years, the crackdown on unlawful immigration has led to increased reporting on local, state and federal immigration policies. But the media coverage often has done more harm than good by using biased language to characterize immigrants and ignoring the many challenges faced by immigrant women in particular.

Improving Media Coverage of Racial Profiling

Author: 
Nadra Kareem Nittle
Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Even as incidents of racial profiling by law enforcement agencies continue to rise across the country, some activists say the media haven’t grasped how to provide comprehensive coverage of the story.

With elected officials and the public concerned about crime, authorities have been randomly stopping and searching people suspected of criminal involvement, even without evidence of illegal activity. Most often, victims of such random stops are people of color, usually Latinos and African-Americans. 

Syndicate content