Welcome to the Maynard Institute

Welcome to The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education -  We promote diversity in the news media through improved coverage, hiring, business practices & training programs that equip journalists with leadership, multimedia skills and subject expertise for news organizations across platforms. Our primary mission is to ensure that all segments of our diverse society are fairly, accurately and credibly portrayed.

 

Richard Prince's Journal-isms™

Barred From Their Own Homes

Friday, February 5, 2016

People of color victimized by NYPD tactic, reporters find; . . . one woman's list of 13 black investigative reporters; Dallas Morning News rehires 10 of 19 people it let go; NABJ, CNN meeting again — association's deficit swells; remembering the sound, if not the face, of Maurice White; AP finds Clinton errs on Wall Street — Sanders on wealthy; little press for U.N. group's call for reparations in U.S.; BuzzFeed finds quiet crackdown on Indian immigrants; diversity coalition expands focus from TV to big screen (2/5/16)

 

from Maynard Forum

Inspirational words for Sac Voices

Sacramento City College journalism professor Dianne Heimer and Sacramento Voices alum Burt Clemons used heartfelt and inspirational words to describe the importance of community journalism at a Sacramento Voices training workshop in February.

Heimer examined how traditional media outlets overlook stories in many South Sacramento neighborhoods, unless the stories involve crime.

“You are the only people who can tell the real stories from those neighborhoods, because you live there and are part of the community,” she said. “This is a significant and wonderful opportunity.”

[Read more]

 
  

from The Front Door Project

Journalists’ Biases Must Be Part Of Frank Conversation on Race

By Karen M. Turner
January 15, 2015

Every January when I offer my online course, “Race and Racism in the News,” I ask students to list and briefly analyze media coverage of their three most important race-related stories from the previous year. When they do this exercise this month, they will have a plethora of stories from which to choose.

The tone was set for 2014 on Jan. 19 with the outrageous and controversial backlash after Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, who had just made the play of his life, “ranted” on air to Fox Sports sideline reporter Erin Andrews. Criticism of the then 25-year-old, including vitriolic tweets, laid the foundation for the media’s sometimes mediocre job in subsequent months on a story clearly about race and young men of color.

[Read more]

 
  

from Dori Maynard

How Sherman 'Rant' Could Help Change Coverage of Black Men

On a friend’s Facebook page, a commenter contended that the Richard Sherman controversy was just a sideshow. More important, she wrote, we should be focusing on the push to roll back civil rights.

Yes, a football player talking trash after a game should be a sideshow. And, according to Deadspin, when white athletes such as Brett Favre act up, it is exactly that.

In Sherman’s case, though, an argument can be made that it is the main show, with very familiar themes.

 
  

from Grapevine

MIJE Board Member and Voices Co-Founder Wins Distinguished Journalist Award

Martin G. Reynolds of Digital First Media receives the SPJ NorCal Board of Directors’ Distinguished Service to Journalism Award. Reynolds is senior editor for community engagement and training for Bay Area News Group and Digital First Media, western region.

[Link to full article at SPJnorcal.org]